10+ Best Locations to Live in Ireland

Updated On: December 29, 2022

Best Locations to Live in Ireland

In this article, we will show a list of the 18 best locations to live in Ireland stunning place to live in; the Republic of Ireland is an island country in western Europe. Up to its declaration of independence in 1922, it was a member of the United Kingdom. Thirty-two counties make up the nation. 

The Atlantic, Irish, and North Channels all encircle the island nation of Ireland. It has a moderate climate. Ireland’s settlements were on plains, coastal peninsulas, hills, and mountains. 

The Irish are renowned for their passion for various sports, including swimming, horse racing, football, and rugby. They also value the arts and culture, and many communities hold annual festivals that draw locals and tourists. Historic sites like cathedrals and castles can be found in many communities. The Irish also enjoy dining, shopping, and going to the pub. The Irish are renowned for being hospitable and friendly when welcoming guests to their towns.

18 Best Locations to Live in Ireland

1) Dublin

Dublin is a mash-up, like many contemporary cities. Many glorious international cultures have influenced Dublin and its traditional Irish culture. The largest city in Ireland attracts visitors from around the globe thanks to its rapidly expanding immigrant population. The diverse and lively culinary scene found here is a clear indication of the influence of these cultures. 

Nevertheless, Dublin has managed to preserve a few of its standard features. Known for its customs, fresh pints of Guinness are never in short supply, along with superb literature, folklore, traditional music, and dancing. On their next trip to Dublin, visitors should plan to experience both the traditional and the modern. 

The best way to see Dublin’s duality is to sign up for one of the top tours. And if you’re interested in taking a day trip to some of Ireland’s most well-known attractions, like the Cliffs of Moher. Look into the top Ireland tours, which handle your logistics and organising.

2) Galway

On the western side of Ireland, in County Galway, you’ll find a land of untamed beauty that is home to the breathtaking Cliffs of Moher. The incredible Wild Atlantic Way and the enchanting Aran Islands. Galway City, a bustling university town, serves as the base for most visitors. From here, many of the top Ireland tours take tourists to these breathtaking natural wonders. 

An excellent nightlife scene, including pubs, theatres, and, of course, music, can be found in the city because of its youthful atmosphere. Fantastic festivals, such as the Galway International Oyster Festival and Galway International Arts Festival, take place during the summer. Galway was selected as one of only five UNESCO Cities of Film in 2014 and will serve as the European Capital of Culture in 2020. 

It is also the location of the more than 400-year-old creation of the well-known Irish Claddagh ring, which consists of hands clasped around a heart with a crown above it. Galway is also an excellent site to hear the language because it is the only bilingual city in Ireland, with 20% of the population speaking Irish or Gaelic.

Clifden County Galway – The Capital of Connemara – Ireland. We love Clifden, Ireland #Galway

3) Kenmare

Kenmare is the place to be if you enjoy mouthwatering food, vibrant artwork, upbeat music, and enjoy sightseeing. Kenmare, a quaint town on Ireland’s west coast, is well-known for its welcoming pubs and fantastic food made with fresh local ingredients. The Soundz of Music music store is a treasure trove for music lovers, filled with traditional and unusual musical instruments. 

The charming and cosy Horseshoe Pub is the best place to enjoy a meal and a drink. Here, you can savour a seafood entrée made with fresh seafood while sipping on delectable cocktails. Sheen Falls Lodge offers premium service and is in a stunning natural environment. In every way, this five-star luxury hotel is extravagant, and the rooms are warm and elegant.

4) Cork 

Along the Lee River’s banks is a city called Cork, which boasts a colourful but turbulent past. The town of The Rebel County got its moniker from fighting off Viking invasions and the brutality of the Irish War of Independence. Cork is a strange city with a large opera house and a museum dedicated to butter. 

The Franciscan Well Brewery is a local favourite, and there is a long history of beer brewing in this area. This place, once a monastery, offers acceptable samples of sudsy ales and lagers in addition to a laid-back beer garden. An idyllic, peaceful setting can be found at the Kingsley Hotel, which looks out over the River Lee. Numerous rooms offer lovely river views, and the amenities are top-notch.

5) Kilkenny

Because it exported black marble across the British Empire, Kilkenny, a jewel of the Middle Ages, earned the nickname Marble City. The charming city of Kilkenny, situated in southeast Ireland, is surrounded by beautiful greenery and old buildings. The Kilkenny Arts Festival, Ireland’s longest-running arts event, is held in Kilkenny, a city with a rich heritage of great artistic traditions. 

Additionally, the Kilkenny landscape is dotted with several historic structures from earlier times, including significant crosses, exquisitely engraved stones, spectacular castles, and beautiful abbeys. The Hotel Kilkenny is the epitome of stylish minimalism. The luxurious elements in this four-star hotel, which is in the city’s heart, range from tasteful custom-made furniture to lovely French wallpaper. A magnificent indoor pool, a soothing hot tub, and many other amenities are available.

Kilkenny Castle | Kilkenny | Ireland | Things to Do in Kilkenny | Kilkenny Castle History

6) Shannon

Shannon is a good choice if you enjoy mediaeval banquet-style feasting, kayaking on calm waters, and battle reenactments. Shannon is a charming town in the west of Ireland but is frequently passed over in favour of more well-known cities like Dublin and Cork. Shannon boasts a variety of attractions and is dripping with Irish charm. 

Explore Craggaunowen Park and Castle, an ancient settlement with replicas of historical battles, or go to Bunratty Castle for a delicious four-course meal and entertainment. The mighty River Shannon provides serene, fun-filled, and beautiful aquatic views. In a convenient location just a few steps from Shannon International Airport’s main terminal, The Park Inn by Radisson Shannon Airport is a clean and uncluttered hotel. Simple, well-lit rooms with plenty of comfortable amenities are available.

7) Killarney

Killarney is the kind of picture-perfect location that is a haven for history and nature enthusiasts. This charming town, situated on the shores of lovely Lough Leane, the largest of Killarney’s three lakes, exudes an unmistakable Irish vibe. A beautiful national park and the renowned 124-mile (200-kilometre) Kerry Way walking trail showcases the best of Ireland’s natural beauty. 

Colourful structures distinguish the historic landscape of Killarney from the 1800s and the majesty of St. Mary’s Cathedral. Even those looking for retail therapy can benefit from excellent shopping. Providing views of the lovely Killarney National Park, the Killarney Plaza Hotel & Spa is a top choice. At this opulent four-star hotel, savour delectable fare, first-rate spa services, and superb accommodations.

8) Limerick

Limerick is one of the oldest cities in Ireland. This town was founded by Vikings as far back as the ninth century and boasted stunning Georgian architecture! On the banks of the River Shannon, Limerick is a picturesque location. The environment is brimming with personality and fascinating history. The locals of Limerick are passionate about rugby. They have the longest footbridge in Europe at the University of Limerick.

An enjoyable international film festival is held annually in the town to honour the late Irish actor and Limerick native Richard Harris. The Limerick City Hotel is an excellent lodging option in a lovely setting. It is located in the heart of Limerick on the banks of the River Shannon. The accommodations are tastefully elegant and filled with many contemporary comforts.

9) Aughrim

You might not think a town that used to be a granite mine would be a desirable place to live, but you have yet to see Aughrim. Aughrim, a charming village in eastern Ireland, is characterised by the roaring waters of the Aughrim River, which enhance the laid-back ambience of this lovely town. The granite from the mines was used extensively in the construction of the village, giving it a distinctive and unified architecture. 

The pleasant town of Aughrim, which has received numerous awards for cleanliness, is home to some of Ireland’s most significant battles, including the bloodiest in Irish history: the Battle of Aughrim. Warm charm can be found at the Macreddin Rock Bed & Breakfast, which also has a tranquil patio and attractive garden views. This delightful accommodation choice features lovely river views and plush beds. A superb Irish or vegetarian breakfast is even cosier in Aughrim’s lush environs.

10) Dungarvan

Dungarvan offers a dreamy setting amidst lovely architecture, much like a vibrant postcard. Why Dungarvan is one of Ireland’s most favoured coastal destinations is simple to understand. On Ireland’s southeast coast, under the shadow of the stunning Comeragh mountains, is the thriving market town of Dungarvan. Locals enjoy picnics and sunbathing on the wide sandy beach at Clonea Strand. 

They also like biking or trekking along the Waterford Greenway, a rail trail that offers breathtaking vistas. Living in Dungarvan is like entering a paradise of Irish charm and beauty. The Park Hotel, Holiday Homes & Leisure Centre is the top choice in the city and is housed in posh surroundings. This hotel offers nicely furnished rooms, a family-friendly setting, and a great playground. It is situated on 5 acres (2.02 hectares) of beautifully landscaped grounds.

11) Skerries

Skerries are the ideal location if you’re searching for a calm and laid-back way of life. The Irish Sea can be seen beautifully from this small town close to Dublin. Skerries have a much slower pace of life despite being close to the city. As a result of the low cost of living, it’s an excellent option for ex-pats looking to stretch their dollars. Skerries also have several top-notch schools, so you can be sure your kids will receive a top-notch education.

12) Westport

Westport should be on your radar if you’re looking for the best area in Ireland. Westport is ideal for living with its stunning surroundings, amiable residents, and rich culture. Westport, located on the coast of Mayo, is encircled by breathtaking natural beauty.

Numerous stores, eateries, and bars keep you entertained in this vibrant and lively town. It is the ideal choice for families because it has a great selection of hospitals and schools. Additionally, Westport regularly hosts several traditional Irish festivals, so you will be satisfied if you’re looking for a taste of Irish culture.

13) Graystone

Many factors make Greystone such an excellent place for international residents to live. In addition to the unparalleled scenery, there is always something new to learn. Greystone is fortunate to have a temperate climate because it is on the east coast. Locals can take advantage of long summers and relatively mild winters.

A thriving community of musicians, chefs, and artists also resides in Greystone. There is always activity, and the residents are friendly and inviting. Greystones must be at the top of your list if you’re seeking a location to call home.

14) Waterford City

The long and rich history, the vibrant culture, and the stunning natural setting of Waterford City make it a great place to live in Ireland. Since the Middle Ages, the city of Waterford has served as a central hub for commerce and industry. Its port has served as a vital entryway to the rest of Europe.

The magnificent St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Gothic style, constructed in the 13th century, is a part of the city’s UNESCO World Heritage Site. A thriving music scene and numerous museums and galleries can be found in Waterford City. Beautiful rural areas surround the city with rivers, forests, and rolling hills. Anyone who enjoys history, culture, and gorgeous scenery would thrive in Waterford City.

15) Kinsale

Kinsale, 16 miles south of Cork, is a good option if you don’t want to live in the big city but still want to be close. Travelling to Cork for fun is simple because Kinsale has a tremendous public railway system. With just over 5,000 residents, Kinsale is a fishing village and port. 

For example, yachting and sea angling are popular water sports in Kinsale. Gorgeous golf courses are also nearby. The peaceful town is home to many athletes and a strong sense of community.

16) Kildare Town

Kildare is Irish for “Church of the Oak”. The monastery established by Saint Bridgid in the fifth century bears the name of the Irish city in the Midwest. It changed its name to a Carmelite friary. 

With only 8,600 people living there today, the Dublin neighbourhood is quiet. Today, the Curragh Racecourse in the city is well renowned for hosting horse races. Additionally, Kildare Village, a shopping centre, is well-liked. This area is a fantastic spot to live if you don’t want to be in Dublin.

17) Dalkey

Dalkey, a seaside suburb of Dublin in the southeast, is a good option if you don’t want to deal with the congestion and high cost of living in Dublin. The city is named after the nearby offshore island of Dalkey. The Middle Ages saw Dalkey grow into a thriving port city. Later, its quarries were used to harvest stone and granite. There is now rock climbing at the quarry.

Dalkey’s coastline is home to several small harbours. The wildlife adores Dalkey. Along with numerous bird species, you can see seals and wild goats. Dalkey’s main thoroughfare is Castle Street, flanked by churches, castles, stores, and bars. The Jazz and Seafood Festivals are just a few of Dalkey’s events. James Joyce, Maeve Bindy, George Bernard Shaw, and singer-songwriter Van Morrison, all Irish, once called Dalkey their home.

Wildcard – Belfast

Okay, Not technically in Ireland, or to be exact – the Republic of Ireland! But Northern Ireland should be considered, of course. The River Lagan runs along the banks of Belfast, the capital of Northern Ireland. In the 19th century, The city had a rich past and played a significant role in the industrial revolution. Redevelopment and regeneration initiatives were recently undertaken to transform Belfast. 

There are now many amenities and activities available in the city, making it a lively and vibrant place to live. Belfast has a strong sense of community, and the locals are warm and welcoming. Excellent transportation options are available, including frequent flights to London, Dublin, and other significant cities. Living, working, and raising a family in Belfast are all great choices.

The nation is the place to experience all this and more, whether you want to immerse yourself in boisterous pubs filled with welcoming locals or explore the historical ruins of Ireland. Ireland’s scenery and culture are the perfect matches if you need a spiritual pick-me-up. If you call one of these fantastic places home, you’ll undoubtedly feel as fortunate as a leprechaun.